Perception Theories and Kansei Design

Perception Theories and Kansei Design

Lévy, P. (2014). Perception Theories and Kansei Design. In P., Lévy, S., Schütte, & T., Yamanaka (Eds.), the Proceedings of Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research International Conference 2014, KEER2014 (pp 287–297). Linköping, Sweden: Japan Society of Kansei Engineering.

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Approaches to create artifacts taking kansei into consideration are multiple and are shared among various disciplines, such as kansei engineering, kansei science, and kansei design. In this paper, I focus on the discipline of kansei design and show that various approaches exist within this discipline. These can be characterized based on their focus: either the physical or the interactive materiality of the artifact. Indirect kansei design, mostly focusing on the physical materiality, is based on indirect (or mediated) perception theories. It often relies on representations, models, and metaphors to provide meaningful input to the design. Direct kansei design, mostly focusing on the interactive materiality, is based on direct (or ecological) perception theories. It mainly relies on the designerly attitude of the designer in the process, and apprehend design meaning to emerge from the reflection upon design exploration within the process. Describing and differentiating these two approaches show how kansei is considered differently by different approaches of kansei deign, looking forward a dialogue between these approaches in order to obtain a greater insight on kansei and on its consideration for designing.


Rite de transition, a design choreographic exploration of cultural value exchange, through development of intercultural ritual artefacts

Rite de transition, a design choreographic exploration of cultural value exchange, through development of intercultural ritual artefacts

Kint, J., Klooster, S., & Lévy, P. (2014). Rite de transition – a design choreographic exploration of cultural value exchange, through development of intercultural ritual artefacts. In P., Lévy, S., Schütte, & T., Yamanaka (Eds.), the Proceedings of Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research International Conference 2014, KEER2014 (pp 1115–1125). Linköping, Sweden: Japan Society of Kansei Engineering.

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This research project is called Rite de transition. By means of DesignChoreography, an approach developed by Sietske Klooster, we explore the rituals revolving around traditional Turkish marriage. In due course, inspired by an emotional and auto-ethnographic interpretation of the explored rituals, Klooster designs a novel ritual and artefact that intend to embody shared values, hence intercultural exchange. We choose for a bodily first person approach as we estimate that the complexities of the modern world – i.e. cultural clashes and the breakdown of cultures – require a radical change in tackling these issues. We suggest to move away from pure rational analytic approach our society adhered to. We are on the verge of a new era that embraces diversity and organic interaction that cannot and does not have to be standardized, fixed or rigidly defined anymore. Our approach is based on embodiment and phenomenology, allowing us to diverge from narrowing down broad societal and cultural issues to mere rational thinking and judging. We use DesignChoreography as a vehicle, since the knowing and making body can experience meanings and values that lie underneath visual appearance. By doing so we bring about our bodily understanding for intercultural interaction and exchange.