Artefactual emptiness - On appropriation in kansei design

Month: August 2020

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Appropriation is the phenomenon by which an artefact is adapted for a specific use, distinct from the original design intention. By essence, it cannot be planned by design. However, it is a major aspect in the experience one may have in interaction with an artefact, as it leads to the feelings of ownership and to the effective situatedness of the artefact. It is therefore significantly contributing to designing for sustainability and for the everyday. This paper intends to address how design can consider the possibility of appropriation. Taking a kansei design approach, inspired from the nishidian philosophy on perception, we introduce the notion of artefactual emptiness as a space provided by design and left to the user to adapt the artefact for its integration in the habitability of the world. This space is made accessible and inviting by involving irregularities, suggested by Yanagi Soetsu as a means towards beauty, and implemented in design through micro-considerations and micro-frictions. Artefactual emptiness leads to beauty in experience, expected from a kansei perspective and made possible by kansei design. This work on appropriation through kansei design also leads to question the attention appropriation should have in other domains of kansei research, especially kansei evaluation. It calls for finding ways in kansei research to evaluate over time the kansei effect of appropriation on experience.


Studying requirements for designing a vitality data sharing platform from a multi-stakeholder perspective

Month: August 2020

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We see a growing interest in sharing data and a growing desire to give meaning and understanding to data. Data sharing has great potential to promote people’s health and vitality by encouraging collaboration across a variety of parties. Nevertheless, the use of data lags behind due to the lack of consideration of various users’ requirements in designing data sharing platforms. Despite the needs of the socio-technical aspect for designing data platforms, studies in this regard are still limited. In this paper, we present our study to understand diverse requirements from stakeholders for the development of a vitality data sharing platform by identifying what kind of data is related to vitality. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with two groups of stakeholders: (i) representatives of organizations involved in vitality (N=8), and (ii) citizens (N=20). From these interviews, we see that vitality and vitality data are multidimensional and got an insight into the different expectations on such a data platform among the stakeholders. The representatives of organizations involved in vitality, generally expect low-level data. On the other hand, citizens strive to gain more general information. Our findings suggest that various levels of information are required on data platforms as well as social discussion features to enhance the connection among multi-stakeholder.


Philosophy at Work - Postphenomenology as a Generative Lens in Design Research and Practice

Month: August 2020

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We investigate the use of five postphenomenological concepts by bringing them to design practice and using them as a “generative lens” in design research. The use of these concepts in design research creates tension between the general and the particular. In a constructive design research process, we resolve this tension. We follow two complementary lines of inquiry: first, we design a ritual to support a postphenomenological analysis of the workplace. We discuss insights regarding ordering and formulation of the concepts, selecting a technological intermediary and assessing technologies. In the second, we use postphenomenology as a generative lens in designing the ritual. We discuss the iterative process in which the designer shapes specific uses by proposing different designs and reflecting on them using postphenomenological concepts. These reflections point to a responsibility of the designer to incorporate ways of being, ways of knowing and values on top of specific uses and utility.