Transforming practices squad

Project

Transforming Practices (TP) considers the transformations of our societies, dealing with major societal issues, local challenges for social resilience, or everyday activities, as well as their interrelations. Envisioning transformative practices, we question through designing the how, who, why and what of design for these major societal issues.

TP aims at sharing knowledge and sparking collaborations. Since the TP squad is not merely focusing on doing projects, but on learning together to become transformative designers, we are specifically looking for students to join our squad and community, who are interested in experimenting with our underlying philosophy and approach.

In the TP squad, the projects we run are formed from a combination of elements within four main categories: theories, approaches, domains, and challenges.


Project

Tagline

How would our world look like 20, 30, 40 or 50 years from now? Will we monitor each individual on the planet to live a low-risk life? Will we replace organs, eyes, or other parts of our body with artificial alternatives? Will we upload our brains and live on a server? Or do we seek ways to embrace a life more related to mother earth? In this Design Fiction project, several potential healthcare futures are explored. The project is a collaboration between Philips Design, Eindhoven University of Technology, Design Academy Eindhoven, and Frank Kolkman.

When designing and developing for an audience, as was done in this project, a wide range of different opinions have to be dealt with. A well-known example are robots and Artificial intelligence (AI). Some people only see the positive side and potentials: what if robots could take over all our work so we have full-time vacation? Others only see the downsides and risks: what if robots become smarter than people and start attacking us? Either way, the truth will be somewhere in the middle, but it is very important to capture such opinions and discover what society thinks of current developments. The goal of this project was to do exactly that by developing design probes for four potential healthcare futures – based on a framework by Philips Design – and exhibiting them during the Dutch Design Week (DDW) and within Philips to provoke a debate.

During the first part of the project, four teams each developed a design probe for one of the potential futures, which were exhibited at the Dutch Design Week.

The project was continued within another team and a fifth probe was designed based on the insights gathered at the DDW. This time, the focus was laid on preventive healthcare in the present time, which led to the design of a fictive device that helps parents to monitor their baby’s health and aids them in growing a healthy child.

ココアの茶

布団抜け
匙にて点てる
ココアの茶

Barely out of bed,
performing at the spoon
the brown of the hot chocolate

À peine hors du lit,
La performance à la cuillère
du marron du chocolat chaud

Lévy (レヴィ)


People Place Process

People Place Process - A self-reflection tool to become a professional in design thinking, based on Pedagogical Action Research

Tagline

Thesis

The nature of design thinking projects requires a great capacity to solve situated-inquiry problems (versus technical problem solving – Schön). Design thinking requires practitioners to become reflective professionals. This piece of research provides a protocol and tools to guide their journey of self-reflection:

  • A new action research protocol (derived from Pedagogical Action Research) for design thinking practitioners,
  • A conceptual framework (People Place Process) to guide design thinking development, in both academic and business environments,
  • A scale-up model to develop design thinking pedagogy at the scale of an individual educator, a university and a government,
  • An activity framework for both academic and business users to identify competences developed with (and required for) design thinking projects

Pedagogical action research represents the oldest strand of action research, reaching back to the Science of Education movement in the late nineteenth century (Bain, Boone) and revived in the early twentieth century by the work of John Dewey. The ultimate goal of reflective teaching is to develop teachers’ skills in ‘‘reflection-in-action”, i.e., their ability to frame and reframe problems, find solutions instantly on the basis of their interpretation and analysis of the situation, and construct new meanings and directions for future actions (Schön). The protocol and tools developed in this research have been adapted to design thinking projects, both in academic and business contexts.


Stewart

a final bachelor project by Felix Ros - multiple Design prize winner

https://vimeo.com/129643275

https://vimeo.com/170771071

Stewart has received:
. the Core77 award for best interaction design student work
. the Golden A' design award in engineering and technical design

Stewart is a tactile interface designed for a fully autonomous car. Self-driving cars offer obvious benefits such as faster travel and enhanced safety. However, they also eliminate a sense of freedom, expression, and control while driving.

Stewart’s objective is to accommodate a healthy relation between man and machine, to be achieved by an intuitive and expressive form of interaction.

Stewart provides you with constant updates about the car’s behaviour and its intentions. If you don’t agree on the car’s next course of action, you can manipulate Stewart to change this. Stewart will learn from you as you can learn from Stewart, hopefully resulting in a mutually trustful relation.

Interaction through Stewart will bring about a haptic discussion about what the car’s next move will be. Who will win this discussion? Who knows best?


Experiential Design Landscapes

Project

Tagline

Thesis

This thesis takes on a combined approach, from societal and business development angles, to explore the question of ‘how to design for an active and healthy lifestyle. It follows a Research-through-Design approach, which generates new knowledge through the act of designing. A design-driven research method called Experiential Design Landscapes (EDLs) is developed together with accompanying tools and techniques. With the EDL method, the design process is taken into society by creating infrastructures where designers work together with stakeholders in jointly creating experienceable propositions that can evolve over time. These propositions, Experiential Probes, are intelligent, open, sensor- enhanced, and networked products service systems that enable people to develop new and emerging behaviours, and in parallel enable detailed analysis of the emerging data patterns by researchers and designers as a source of inspiration for the development of future systems.
dr. ir. Michel Peeters and dr. ir. Carl Megens


Tea together

Project

Tagline

Our lives are a collection of rituals. The way we wake up, the way we leave or enter our home, the way we prepare our suitcase before going on a trip are just simple examples of the many rituals each of us have constructed and that structure our everyday lives. These rituals are not rigid procedures, but a seemingly established series of activities from which experiential meaning emerges, and by which personal values are expressed.

The aim of this course is to address these qualities embodied in rituals from an interaction design perspective, and to explore the relation between the designed artefacts and the rituals they are involved in. Through this exploration, we will gain insights in the reciprocal nature of these influences between the artefacts and the ritual (and by extension the experiential meanings and the expressed values). The final discussion will address the merits of addressing rituals in interaction design, and how to design for meaningful rituals.

Students: Gabriele Barzilai, Roy Gevers, Thijs Hesby Roeleven, Xihao Hu, Yijun Yu, Huan Zhang


Data resonance

Project

Tagline

What does data feel like? Data Resonance makes the table resonate with surrounding Wi-Fi traffic. Qualities of the digital signals are translated to something you can feel. This gives you a sense of activity at the workplace that is otherwise quiet and hidden. It creates a feedback loop about your own network usage, and a new connection with the activity of colleagues.
Data Resonance is inspired by how the traditional shared workshop acted as an extension of the craftsperson’s body. You saw and heard your colleagues work, and awareness of their activity influenced what you did. Now that much of our creative work happens on the screen, we lost something. With Data Resonance, we become more aware again of colleague’s work in a calm way: we notice when someone is dealing with heavy traffic and when people are taking a break, or just tune in to the rhythms of data that flow through space.


aGravity

Project

Tagline

The aGravity is a device which lets one experience the challenge of levitation. The fingerboard allows one to float over a straight platform, while experiencing a constant evolving environment within. It creates unique interactions that makes one able to develop a new skill and improve over time. The aGravity aims to make more aware and sensitive to what is being perceived and how the slightest movement can influence the whole system.
To get the board hovering, requires focus, concentration and some skill. Though once it is learned to hover the board, it is up to the user how far he or she can go. Giving no precise guidelines, the only rule is to explore, interact and challenge yourself.


DQI Theory

Project

Tagline

ns. The DQI approach to Interaction Design is theory informed. This means that theory inspires and even guides the way we look at interaction, and the way we design for interaction and experience.

Topics:
. Phenomenology and experience (Merlau-Ponty and Dewey)
. Gibsonian theory of perception
. Models of interaction: Interaction Frogger
. Resonance
. Rich Interaction
. Societal Design
. Craftsmanship

These theories, philosophies and models will be explained first and then explored in a series of interaction designs, i.e. practical applications.


Monty

Project

Tagline

Monty a curious entity that has the ability to perceive activity within its field of vision. When Monty detects activity it will gradually move towards the activity until it is in centre of its perception. If its interest is kept on the activity long enough, Monty becomes engaged and will start taking pictures of the activity.
The envisioned environment in which Monty can be used is a designer’s working environment. Here Monty will mainly be interested in the activity of the designer which will lead to process pictures of all the activities performed by this designer. This in turn gives the designer the possibility to reflect on his own process by scrolling through the visual representation of his activities. And will give him process pictures that can be used for communicative purposes.
Due to its curious nature Monty might not always be focused on what you are doing. He can however be temporarily motivated to move towards a particular area on your desk.


Perceptive qualities

Project

Tagline

The perceptive qualities focus on the connection between people and the smart things. The system should both perceive people and be perceived by people. Moreover, a smart thing should be able to perceive other smart things around it, and allow people to perceive these connections. Consequently, the perceptive qualities should be designed such that people can understand how smart things in an environment connect, interact and function.

We will base our study on the research work on perceptual crossing (Deckers, et al., 2012). The figure below shows the descriptive model on perceptual crossing between a person and a designed object.
Using this model, Deckers could describe clearly the relation between a person and an interactive object from an interaction perspective, rather than from a functional perspective. The design notions for perceptive qualities in interaction (Deckers, 2013) are a comprehensive set of design considerations for creating highly interactive artifacts. For example, ‘react to external event‘ provides design considerations on how an artifact should properly react to external and unexpected events so that people can understand that the artifacts are sensitive too, and how they can act or interact in the environment. In this research, we will apply the notions of designing for perceptual crossing (Deckers, et al, 2012) towards the design of interaction qualities between many smart things and many people.
The aim is to be able to describe the interactions between people and smart things, and the way one perceives and interacts within the system. First, this should support designers to comprehend how systems of smart things gather information from their environments and human counterparts (Funk, et al., 2009), and, second, how smart things can express, for instance, available actions or configuration possibilities in the specific context at the moment (Marquardt & Greenberg, 2012). This result might be a general and prescriptive framework for the connections to be perceivable and comprehensible, helping to enhance users’ interaction with the smart things.


Sensual dynamics

Project

Tagline

Prior to interaction, there is perception. Perception is intrinsically rising from one’s actions and from what one senses. These are the way one is connected to the world: acting is the way one impacts the world, sensing is the way one captures it. At this level, in direct contact with the world, there is no information, but energies (or forces). It is these energies and these forces that designers deal with (consciously or unconsciously) when putting a new artefact in the world. This primacy of perception towards interaction is the main focus of this module, proposing an approach to effectively taking it into consideration in the design process.
For design practical reasons, design should focus on qualities of senses. For example, touching is local, reciprocal, and private. It is where I touch, I am touched by what I am touching, and nobody else can touch what I touch. On the other hand, smell is at a distance, possibly unidirectional, and public. These are qualities of senses that can be useful for design. To be so, these qualities need to determined and mapped. Moreover, we may seek differences between static and dynamics qualities of senses.
Finally, designers should comprehend these qualities and engage them in order to find opportunities for design – how can I make something private at a distance? How can techno challenge these qualities (e.g. headphones make sound private)? What implications for design?


LUMA

Project

Tagline

This research project focuses on how to design for perceptive activity in artifacts in order for crossing in perception of expressivity between person and artifact to happen. It is part of the research of Deckers et al (2011), on designing for perceptual crossing between person and artifact. In their work they propose a series of design notions which are meant as a tool for synthesis when designing for perceptive activity in artifacts. In this research we follow a research through design approach in order to generate design specific knowledge on the application of these design notions when designing an artifact capable of showing expressivity through its perceptive behavior. We designed LUMA, an dynamic light design capable of expressing a variable level of excitement thought its perceptive actions. We conducted research using the LUMA design in order to investigate how the stage of perception of expressivity can be reached in an artifact and if crossing of perception of expressivity can happen over the course of interaction between person and artifact. For this we specifically investigate the relation between the perceived expressivity and the occurrence of a cross-influential interplay of expressivity between person and artifact. The results of our experiment show that clarity in variability of this expression is essential for this interplay to occur. We discuss possible changes to the design to improve the clarity in variability of expressivity as well as further research steps.


Perceptive Qualities in System of Interactive Products

Project

Tagline

Thesisnews at TU/e

This doctoral project investigates whether and how to design for perceptive qualities in systems of interactive products from a phenomenological point of view. It sets out to form and frame a new perspective on designing an artefact’s intelligence from a quality- and action-centric approach, rather than a functional approach. Artefacts and the systems they create become increasingly intelligent and disappear to the background of our environment. How do we understand all these intelligible connections that systems create in our environment when they are invisible and highly flexible? Moreover, how do we design for such systems of intelligent and interactive artefacts? I am convinced that if we want to design for successful intelligent systems that are perceptible to and evolve around its user, the artefact’s intelligence has to build on the direct interaction with its user(s). It is shown that, by designing for perceptive qualities, the system’s activity becomes meaningful to its users. Moreover, the user activity becomes meaningful to the system in the course of the interaction.

The work is inspired by and directly synthesises from theory. The theoretical starting point and the generated design-relevant knowledge, in the form of design notions, are a leitmotiv through this work. Three main chapters are structured around this connecting thread. In each of these chapters, designing plays an essential role. The first chapter follows a minimalist approach in context and in implementation to bring forward fundamental knowledge for designing. The second chapter investigates the added value of the generated knowledge for designing, and a step is made towards design practice. In the third chapter, a third-person perspective corroborates the first-person approach and findings. It is crucial that these three chapters feed into each other to inform, inspire and validate.


Welcoming with tea

Project

Tagline

Our lives are a collection of rituals. The way we wake up, the way we leave or enter our home, the way we prepare our suitcase before going on a trip are just simple examples of the many rituals each of us have constructed and that structure our everyday lives. These rituals are not rigid procedures, but a seemingly established series of activities from which experiential meaning emerges, and by which personal values are expressed.

The aim of this course is to address these qualities embodied in rituals from an interaction design perspective, and to explore the relation between the designed artefacts and the rituals they are involved in. Through this exploration, we will gain insights in the reciprocal nature of these influences between the artefacts and the ritual (and by extension the experiential meanings and the expressed values). The final discussion will address the merits of addressing rituals in interaction design, and how to design for meaningful rituals.

To address this course through a project, we will first turn to a Japanese tea ceremony, which is one of the most elaborated and rich rituals and one of the pillars of the Japanese craftsmanship culture. By extracting key characteristics of this ritual, we will start a design exploration to conclude with a concept at the end of the first week. The entire module focuses on one ritual (to be decided), and each group will focus on one artefact within this overarching ritual. The second week focuses on opportunities of a series of prototyping iterations to reach details. Each of them being concluded by a discussion on the reciprocal influences between the artefacts and the ritual and the implication on the interaction design process. The final day will close the module by a demonstration of the ritual with the newly designed series of artefacts.


Systems Design, The Eindhoven School

Project

Tagline

The future of design is unclear, as designerly responsibilities are changing. The emphasis used to be on form and production, but as the products to be designed have changed, design has changed. With an interactive product the designer needs to consider not only the form but also the temporal aspects of the product’s interaction and behaviour, and even the specifics of its functionality. While we are starting to understand how to design for interaction through the integrating of form, interaction and function, the next challenge is already in sight: designing for systems

From a design perspective, there is very little experience of designing systems, and there are no methods ready at hand. However, our question of ?how to design for systems? is not a ?methodology? question in the first place. To formulate a method is to simplify and abstract the design challenge into a defined set of subsequent steps to be taken. In the case of design for systems, this is problematic because it is difficult, if not impossible, to have an overview of the complete system before it exists or of its impact on society. Not only is our grasp of the system limited by our point of view, but systems also allow for many different yet valid points of view, thanks to their inherent complexity.
In order to overcome these issues it is necessary to start exploring the design space for systems. As we have little experience in this area, it is essential that we get involved in designing ourselves and let our insight in these matters grow until we can compile it into a relevant methodology. What is more, we need to take an experiential approach to the design of these systems. That is, we need to undergo the experience of living with such systems as we are designing them if we are to make value judgements on the direction the solution should take. In other words, the uncertainty of method and the complex nature of systems call for a research-through-design approach, with ?doing? as the mechanism for obtaining insight into the process at hand guided by relevant theory and a vision of what we want to achieve.
This exposition contains a selection of projects involving members of the Designing Quality in Interaction (DQI) group in which research, education and industry come together. These projects provide insights into our perspective on design and how it has changed over the years. We aim to paint a picture of a world that could be, as well as giving insight into how we think the design challenge for industrial designers is changing.

Text by Oscar Tomico

Shift

Project

Tagline

Our world is in a constant state of transformation. Most of the time, our view of the world will change parallel to this transformation. The changes in the world are often propelled us as an individual, group, generation or country. Are we aware of the influence we have on our environment? The installation allows you to experience and admire this influence by joining forces with others.

Your acts have meaning!
Students of the Intelligent Lighting Institute of Eindhoven University of Technology want to make visitors of GLOW 2012 think about the amount of control we have on the changing façade of the world. The visitors will be able to experience individual and collective influence on the world around them by collectively replacing weight.

Students: Sietse Dols, Rik Vegt, Evy Ansems, Dennis de Klein, Thom van Boheemen, Nick Hermans, Karin Niemantsverdriet, Troy Reugebrink, Tijmen van Gurp, Job Huberts, Daniël van Paesschen, Martijn Peeters, Jelle Tuinhout, Adriaan de Regt, Maxim Sakovic, Freek de Bruijn, Teije Oudshoorn, Tom Kölker.


Kinetic folds: interaction priming

Project

Tagline

This research focuses on what happens to our relationship with objects when they come alive and engage in reciprocal communication with us.
The prototype was inspired by the moment of perceptual crossing that occurs when you meet a stray cat in the street, and a moment of anticipation makes time stand still, as you and the cat try to figure each other out.
Using a single sheet of folded paper and embedding it with motors and custom-built touch-capacitive sensors, an object which breathes and responds to the presence of human touch was designed, creating the perception that the Kinetic Fold is alive.


Rights through Making – Skills for pervasive ethics

This thesis starts with a Manifesto, bold, passionate and ambitious. Goals are set high, as to commit to a major endeavour: how can design contribute to a new civilisation. The first version was written in 2006 in Bertinoro, Italy, where Caroline Hummels, Kees Overbeeke and I were giving a workshop on Aesthetics of Interaction for the University of Bologna. In this Manifesto, we declared our belief and proposed a vision, concerning how design can change Western thinking towards pervasive ethics. By pervasive ethics I mean a social praxis aimed at justice and freedom, which pervades society in a capillary way, becoming a Universal attitude that makes people aware of their own rights, able and willing to contribute to seeing their own rights and those of all people fulfilled. I called this approach Rights though Making. The manifesto stated a mission1, which was later applied and validated. The main lines of thoughts of the manifesto have been respected and enforced through several actions. This thesis will describe these actions, the underlying theory and the related reflection both on the approach and on the outcomes. The Manifesto integrated the points of view of the writers, united by a common drive, in a world riddled with all sorts of social uncertainties. In the Manifesto we declared our intention of preparing and doing workshops with students of different nationalities, stimulating the integration of skilful points of view among future designers. When the Manifesto was written, there was not yet a concrete strategy on how to empower people towards pervasive ethics. The only anchor point was the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. We wanted the values contained in this document materialised, embodied in (intelligent) products or systems. Both the outcome of what we were envisioning (intelligent products or systems empowering towards the realisation of human rights) and the process of realising it (workshop) had to work towards ethics. This was all I knew at that point. Later I designed the way to do it, based on this solid and enthusiastic shared vision.

Throughout the years, the underlying theoretical framework started to acquire its own body. Only after the realisation of the first 5 workshops (out of 7 in total), was I able to explicitly structure and describe the platform of theory that was supporting my endeavour. These actions (the workshops), contributed to the formation of a body of knowledge, of which the potential strength and soundness until then had exclusively been perceived through intuition. This tacit knowledge was dredged out, reflected upon and refined, through iterations of reflection-on-action, in which the “active” parts were the individual workshops.

Thus the forming of this theoretical platform, the refinement of the research quest or design challenge and giving the workshops were overlapping in time and closely intertwined. For clarity, in this thesis I chose to position them in the following order:

  • Part 1: defining the design challenge / research quest and the Rights through Making Approach;
  • Part 2: illustrating the theoretical framework underlying the whole work. This theoretical framework is formed by three elements: (1) Ethics (2) Making and (3) their integration, i.e. how Making empowers towards Ethics: the core of the RtM approach.
  • Part 3: describing how this theory is applied in design workshops and how the Rights through Making (RtM) approach evolved;
  • Part 4: reflecting on the overall research experience and the underlying personal motivations.

Before this central body I placed and introductory part, containing acknowledgments, rights of the readers, synopsis (this chapter) and tables of contents. After the fourth part, I positioned a part called “Annexes”, which is composed of two main sections:

  • In the first section I present the RtM workshops in detail, in regard to both the process of each RtM workshop and their evolution;
  • In the second section, I illustrate the direction in which I envision the diffusion of RtM in the future, through the realisation of an Internet platform.


Passage

Project

Tagline

(Extrait de mon HDR)

Passage est un projet réalisé en 2012 par Gracia Goh, Chiyong Lim, et Kate Vermeyen à l’Université de Technologie d’Eindhoven. Ces étudiants en design ont réalisé un projet basé sur la contexture kansei précédemment présentée. Passage s’intéresse au lieu de transition entre deux espaces physiques, c’est-à-dire à leur entre-espace. L’énoncé du projet invite les étudiant à réaliser un design pour l’entre-espace en évitant d’influencer l’expérience de l’un des deux espaces. Cet énoncé semble a priori phénoménologiquement incohérent, puisque l’expérience d’une chose extérieure à soi a nécessairement lieu dans un espace et demande de plus que l’attention de l’utilisateur soit dirigée au moins partiellement vers cette chose. Or non seulement l’entre-espace ne semble pas être un espace (mais plutôt une surface), et l’attention d’une personne passant une porte est le plus souvent dirigée vers l’espace dans lequel elle compte se rendre.

Après de multiples itérations incluant des fabrications de prototypes, des essais en situation, des réflexions basées sur la contexture kansei, etc., un remarquable design a progressivement pris forme. Passage est une installation montée sur le cadre d’une porte. Cette installation est composée d’une ligne de diodes électroluminescentes (LEDs RGB) projetée sur une feuille d’aluminium fine qui réfléchit la lumière en direction de la porte une fois entrouverte. Les diodes changent très lentement la couleur émise. La feuille d’aluminium ondule en fonction de la manière dont la porte est ouverte : une ouverture franche créera bien plus de turbulences qu’une ouverture lente. L’impression lumineuse projetée sur la porte est donc unique à chaque ouverture et à chaque fermeture.

Ce qui est remarquable dans ce design est que la projection lumineuse n’est pas visible par le passant lorsque la porte est complètement fermée ou franchement ouverte, si bien que l’interaction n’a lieu que dans l’action de l’ouverture de la porte. L’expérience commence dès que l’on commence à ouvrir la porte et finit avant que l’on ait fini de l’ouvrir. Non seulement l’installation se trouve (quasiment) localisée dans cet entre-espace, mais l’expérience est également localisée dans cet entre-espace : elle n’interfère quasiment pas avec l’intentionnalité du passant de passer dans l’espace suivant. L’objectif du design est ainsi atteint.

Outre certains descripteurs kansei « classiques », tels que le grain, l’interaction lumière-ombre ou la sensation d’une invitation à apprécier cet entre-espace, des descripteurs kansei spécifiques à ce projet ont été établis : l’instantanéité et l’insaisissable, et plus encore leur couple. Ce qui est remarquable est que cette expérience est prenante du point de vue de son expression, engageante par le geste, et que son intensité vient du fait qu’elle est très courte, inéluctable, et insaisissable : en un instant elle nous engage puis nous libère, sans qu’on puisse vraiment y échapper, ni en faire quoi que ce soit. Là est la beauté de ce design.

(Excerpt from my Habilitation)

Passage is a project carried out in 2012 by Gracia Goh, Chiyong Lim, and Kate Vermeyen at the Eindhoven University of Technology. These design students carried out a project based on the kansei context previously presented. Passage focuses on the place of transition between two physical spaces, i.e. their inter-space. The project statement invites students to create a design for the inter-space without influencing the experience of either space. This statement seems a priori phenomenologically incoherent, since the experience of something external to oneself necessarily takes place in a space and requires that the user’s attention be directed at least partially towards this thing. Yet, not only does the inter-space not seem to be a space (but rather a surface), and the attention of a person passing through a door is most often directed towards the space in which they intend to travel.

After multiple iterations including prototype production, situation tests, reflections based on the Kansei context, etc., a remarkable design has gradually taken shape. Passage is an installation mounted on the frame of a door. This installation consists of a line of light-emitting diodes (RGB LEDs) projected on a thin aluminium foil that reflects light back towards the door once it is ajar. The diodes very slowly change the emitted color. The aluminium foil undulates depending on how the door is opened: a quick opening will create much more turbulence than a slow opening. The light impression projected on the door is therefore unique with each opening and closing.

What is remarkable about this design is that the light projection is not visible to the passer-by when the door is fully closed or open, so that interaction only takes place in the action of the door opening. The experience begins as soon as you start opening the door and ends before you finish opening it. Not only is the installation (almost) located in this inter-space, but the experience is also located in this inter-space: it almost does not interfere with the passer-by’s intentionality to pass into the next space. The design objective is thus achieved.

In addition to certain “classical” kansei descriptors, such as the grain, the light-shade interaction or the feeling of an invitation to appreciate this inter-space, kansei descriptors specific to this project have been established: instantaneity and the elusive, and even more so their couple. What is remarkable is that this experience is engaging from the point of view of its expression, engaging by the gesture, and that its intensity comes from the fact that it is very short, unavoidable, and elusive: in an instant it engages us then liberates us, without us being able to really escape it, or do anything about it. That is the beauty of this design.