Tea together

Tea together

A TU/e master elective project

Our lives are a collection of rituals. The way we wake up, the way we leave or enter our home, the way we prepare our suitcase before going on a trip are just simple examples of the many rituals each of us have constructed and that structure our everyday lives. These rituals are not rigid procedures, but a seemingly established series of activities from which experiential meaning emerges, and by which personal values are expressed.

The aim of this course is to address these qualities embodied in rituals from an interaction design perspective, and to explore the relation between the designed artefacts and the rituals they are involved in. Through this exploration, we will gain insights in the reciprocal nature of these influences between the artefacts and the ritual (and by extension the experiential meanings and the expressed values). The final discussion will address the merits of addressing rituals in interaction design, and how to design for meaningful rituals.

Students: Gabriele Barzilai, Roy Gevers, Thijs Hesby Roeleven, Xihao Hu, Yijun Yu, Huan Zhang


DQI Theory

DQI Theory

Theories involved in Designing Quality in Interaction

ns. The DQI approach to Interaction Design is theory informed. This means that theory inspires and even guides the way we look at interaction, and the way we design for interaction and experience.

Topics:
. Phenomenology and experience (Merlau-Ponty and Dewey)
. Gibsonian theory of perception
. Models of interaction: Interaction Frogger
. Resonance
. Rich Interaction
. Societal Design
. Craftsmanship

These theories, philosophies and models will be explained first and then explored in a series of interaction designs, i.e. practical applications.


Perceptive qualities

Perceptive qualities

Increasing quality in interaction

The perceptive qualities focus on the connection between people and the smart things. The system should both perceive people and be perceived by people. Moreover, a smart thing should be able to perceive other smart things around it, and allow people to perceive these connections. Consequently, the perceptive qualities should be designed such that people can understand how smart things in an environment connect, interact and function.

We will base our study on the research work on perceptual crossing (Deckers, et al., 2012). The figure below shows the descriptive model on perceptual crossing between a person and a designed object.
Using this model, Deckers could describe clearly the relation between a person and an interactive object from an interaction perspective, rather than from a functional perspective. The design notions for perceptive qualities in interaction (Deckers, 2013) are a comprehensive set of design considerations for creating highly interactive artifacts. For example, ‘react to external event‘ provides design considerations on how an artifact should properly react to external and unexpected events so that people can understand that the artifacts are sensitive too, and how they can act or interact in the environment. In this research, we will apply the notions of designing for perceptual crossing (Deckers, et al, 2012) towards the design of interaction qualities between many smart things and many people.
The aim is to be able to describe the interactions between people and smart things, and the way one perceives and interacts within the system. First, this should support designers to comprehend how systems of smart things gather information from their environments and human counterparts (Funk, et al., 2009), and, second, how smart things can express, for instance, available actions or configuration possibilities in the specific context at the moment (Marquardt & Greenberg, 2012). This result might be a general and prescriptive framework for the connections to be perceivable and comprehensible, helping to enhance users’ interaction with the smart things.


Sensual dynamics

Sensual dynamics

Exploring sensorial qualities in interaction

Prior to interaction, there is perception. Perception is intrinsically rising from one’s actions and from what one senses. These are the way one is connected to the world: acting is the way one impacts the world, sensing is the way one captures it. At this level, in direct contact with the world, there is no information, but energies (or forces). It is these energies and these forces that designers deal with (consciously or unconsciously) when putting a new artefact in the world. This primacy of perception towards interaction is the main focus of this module, proposing an approach to effectively taking it into consideration in the design process.
For design practical reasons, design should focus on qualities of senses. For example, touching is local, reciprocal, and private. It is where I touch, I am touched by what I am touching, and nobody else can touch what I touch. On the other hand, smell is at a distance, possibly unidirectional, and public. These are qualities of senses that can be useful for design. To be so, these qualities need to determined and mapped. Moreover, we may seek differences between static and dynamics qualities of senses.
Finally, designers should comprehend these qualities and engage them in order to find opportunities for design – how can I make something private at a distance? How can techno challenge these qualities (e.g. headphones make sound private)? What implications for design?


Welcoming with tea

Welcoming with tea

A TU/e master workshop

Our lives are a collection of rituals. The way we wake up, the way we leave or enter our home, the way we prepare our suitcase before going on a trip are just simple examples of the many rituals each of us have constructed and that structure our everyday lives. These rituals are not rigid procedures, but a seemingly established series of activities from which experiential meaning emerges, and by which personal values are expressed.

The aim of this course is to address these qualities embodied in rituals from an interaction design perspective, and to explore the relation between the designed artefacts and the rituals they are involved in. Through this exploration, we will gain insights in the reciprocal nature of these influences between the artefacts and the ritual (and by extension the experiential meanings and the expressed values). The final discussion will address the merits of addressing rituals in interaction design, and how to design for meaningful rituals.

To address this course through a project, we will first turn to a Japanese tea ceremony, which is one of the most elaborated and rich rituals and one of the pillars of the Japanese craftsmanship culture. By extracting key characteristics of this ritual, we will start a design exploration to conclude with a concept at the end of the first week. The entire module focuses on one ritual (to be decided), and each group will focus on one artefact within this overarching ritual. The second week focuses on opportunities of a series of prototyping iterations to reach details. Each of them being concluded by a discussion on the reciprocal influences between the artefacts and the ritual and the implication on the interaction design process. The final day will close the module by a demonstration of the ritual with the newly designed series of artefacts.


Shift

Shift

An installation of master students working with the Intelligent Lighting Institute at TU/e

Our world is in a constant state of transformation. Most of the time, our view of the world will change parallel to this transformation. The changes in the world are often propelled us as an individual, group, generation or country. Are we aware of the influence we have on our environment? The installation allows you to experience and admire this influence by joining forces with others.

Your acts have meaning!
Students of the Intelligent Lighting Institute of Eindhoven University of Technology want to make visitors of GLOW 2012 think about the amount of control we have on the changing façade of the world. The visitors will be able to experience individual and collective influence on the world around them by collectively replacing weight.

Students: Sietse Dols, Rik Vegt, Evy Ansems, Dennis de Klein, Thom van Boheemen, Nick Hermans, Karin Niemantsverdriet, Troy Reugebrink, Tijmen van Gurp, Job Huberts, Daniël van Paesschen, Martijn Peeters, Jelle Tuinhout, Adriaan de Regt, Maxim Sakovic, Freek de Bruijn, Teije Oudshoorn, Tom Kölker.


Passage

Passage

A bachelor project by ChiYong Lim, Gracia Goh and Kate Vermeyen in Kansei design

(Extrait de mon HDR)

Passage est un projet réalisé en 2012 par Gracia Goh, Chiyong Lim, et Kate Vermeyen à l’Université de Technologie d’Eindhoven. Ces étudiants en design ont réalisé un projet basé sur la contexture kansei précédemment présentée. Passage s’intéresse au lieu de transition entre deux espaces physiques, c’est-à-dire à leur entre-espace. L’énoncé du projet invite les étudiant à réaliser un design pour l’entre-espace en évitant d’influencer l’expérience de l’un des deux espaces. Cet énoncé semble a priori phénoménologiquement incohérent, puisque l’expérience d’une chose extérieure à soi a nécessairement lieu dans un espace et demande de plus que l’attention de l’utilisateur soit dirigée au moins partiellement vers cette chose. Or non seulement l’entre-espace ne semble pas être un espace (mais plutôt une surface), et l’attention d’une personne passant une porte est le plus souvent dirigée vers l’espace dans lequel elle compte se rendre.

Après de multiples itérations incluant des fabrications de prototypes, des essais en situation, des réflexions basées sur la contexture kansei, etc., un remarquable design a progressivement pris forme. Passage est une installation montée sur le cadre d’une porte. Cette installation est composée d’une ligne de diodes électroluminescentes (LEDs RGB) projetée sur une feuille d’aluminium fine qui réfléchit la lumière en direction de la porte une fois entrouverte. Les diodes changent très lentement la couleur émise. La feuille d’aluminium ondule en fonction de la manière dont la porte est ouverte : une ouverture franche créera bien plus de turbulences qu’une ouverture lente. L’impression lumineuse projetée sur la porte est donc unique à chaque ouverture et à chaque fermeture.

Ce qui est remarquable dans ce design est que la projection lumineuse n’est pas visible par le passant lorsque la porte est complètement fermée ou franchement ouverte, si bien que l’interaction n’a lieu que dans l’action de l’ouverture de la porte. L’expérience commence dès que l’on commence à ouvrir la porte et finit avant que l’on ait fini de l’ouvrir. Non seulement l’installation se trouve (quasiment) localisée dans cet entre-espace, mais l’expérience est également localisée dans cet entre-espace : elle n’interfère quasiment pas avec l’intentionnalité du passant de passer dans l’espace suivant. L’objectif du design est ainsi atteint.

Outre certains descripteurs kansei « classiques », tels que le grain, l’interaction lumière-ombre ou la sensation d’une invitation à apprécier cet entre-espace, des descripteurs kansei spécifiques à ce projet ont été établis : l’instantanéité et l’insaisissable, et plus encore leur couple. Ce qui est remarquable est que cette expérience est prenante du point de vue de son expression, engageante par le geste, et que son intensité vient du fait qu’elle est très courte, inéluctable, et insaisissable : en un instant elle nous engage puis nous libère, sans qu’on puisse vraiment y échapper, ni en faire quoi que ce soit. Là est la beauté de ce design.

(Excerpt from my Habilitation)

Passage is a project carried out in 2012 by Gracia Goh, Chiyong Lim, and Kate Vermeyen at the Eindhoven University of Technology. These design students carried out a project based on the kansei context previously presented. Passage focuses on the place of transition between two physical spaces, i.e. their inter-space. The project statement invites students to create a design for the inter-space without influencing the experience of either space. This statement seems a priori phenomenologically incoherent, since the experience of something external to oneself necessarily takes place in a space and requires that the user’s attention be directed at least partially towards this thing. Yet, not only does the inter-space not seem to be a space (but rather a surface), and the attention of a person passing through a door is most often directed towards the space in which they intend to travel.

After multiple iterations including prototype production, situation tests, reflections based on the Kansei context, etc., a remarkable design has gradually taken shape. Passage is an installation mounted on the frame of a door. This installation consists of a line of light-emitting diodes (RGB LEDs) projected on a thin aluminium foil that reflects light back towards the door once it is ajar. The diodes very slowly change the emitted color. The aluminium foil undulates depending on how the door is opened: a quick opening will create much more turbulence than a slow opening. The light impression projected on the door is therefore unique with each opening and closing.

What is remarkable about this design is that the light projection is not visible to the passer-by when the door is fully closed or open, so that interaction only takes place in the action of the door opening. The experience begins as soon as you start opening the door and ends before you finish opening it. Not only is the installation (almost) located in this inter-space, but the experience is also located in this inter-space: it almost does not interfere with the passer-by’s intentionality to pass into the next space. The design objective is thus achieved.

In addition to certain “classical” kansei descriptors, such as the grain, the light-shade interaction or the feeling of an invitation to appreciate this inter-space, kansei descriptors specific to this project have been established: instantaneity and the elusive, and even more so their couple. What is remarkable is that this experience is engaging from the point of view of its expression, engaging by the gesture, and that its intensity comes from the fact that it is very short, unavoidable, and elusive: in an instant it engages us then liberates us, without us being able to really escape it, or do anything about it. That is the beauty of this design.