Artefactual emptiness - On appropriation in kansei design

Artefactual emptiness – On appropriation in kansei design

Lévy, P. (2020). Artefactual emptiness - On appropriation in kansei design. Proceedings of Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research International Conference 2020, KEER2020 ([on CD]). Tokyo, Japan: Japan Society of Kansei Engineering.

paper

Appropriation is the phenomenon by which an artefact is adapted for a specific use, distinct from the original design intention. By essence, it cannot be planned by design. However, it is a major aspect in the experience one may have in interaction with an artefact, as it leads to the feelings of ownership and to the effective situatedness of the artefact. It is therefore significantly contributing to designing for sustainability and for the everyday. This paper intends to address how design can consider the possibility of appropriation. Taking a kansei design approach, inspired from the nishidian philosophy on perception, we introduce the notion of artefactual emptiness as a space provided by design and left to the user to adapt the artefact for its integration in the habitability of the world. This space is made accessible and inviting by involving irregularities, suggested by Yanagi Soetsu as a means towards beauty, and implemented in design through micro-considerations and micro-frictions. Artefactual emptiness leads to beauty in experience, expected from a kansei perspective and made possible by kansei design. This work on appropriation through kansei design also leads to question the attention appropriation should have in other domains of kansei research, especially kansei evaluation. It calls for finding ways in kansei research to evaluate over time the kansei effect of appropriation on experience.


Philosophy at Work - Postphenomenology as a Generative Lens in Design Research and Practice

Philosophy at Work – Postphenomenology as a Generative Lens in Design Research and Practice

van der Zwan, S., Smith, M. L., Bruineberg, J., Lévy, P., & Hummels, C. C. M. (2020). Philosophy at Work - Postphenomenology as a Generative Lens in Design Research and Practice. Proceedings of the Design Research Society 2020, DRS2020, Sydney, Australia (online). https://doi.org/10.21606/drs.2020.337

paper

We investigate the use of five postphenomenological concepts by bringing them to design practice and using them as a “generative lens” in design research. The use of these concepts in design research creates tension between the general and the particular. In a constructive design research process, we resolve this tension. We follow two complementary lines of inquiry: first, we design a ritual to support a postphenomenological analysis of the workplace. We discuss insights regarding ordering and formulation of the concepts, selecting a technological intermediary and assessing technologies. In the second, we use postphenomenology as a generative lens in designing the ritual. We discuss the iterative process in which the designer shapes specific uses by proposing different designs and reflecting on them using postphenomenological concepts. These reflections point to a responsibility of the designer to incorporate ways of being, ways of knowing and values on top of specific uses and utility.


Exploring Public Playgrounds through a Data-Enabled Design Approach

Exploring Public Playgrounds through a Data-Enabled Design Approach

van den Heuvel, R., Lévy, P., Vos, S., & Hummels, C. (2020). Exploring Public Playgrounds through A Data-Enabled Design Approach. Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference, 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1145/3393914.3395865

paperacm library

A shared goal set by many local governments is to stimulate physical activity in neighborhoods. Public playgrounds play an important role in governmental policies for promoting physical activity. Although these playgrounds are generally considered beneficial for participation in physical activity, detailed data on their use is lacking. As a result, it is not clear to policymakers whether their policy choices are the right ones and designers cannot sufficiently align their design choices with the actual behavior of their end users. This Work-in-Progress presents a sensor-based data collection approach to collect detailed data in a real-life setting over a longer period of time. With this, we adapted the Data-Enabled Design process towards public environments by combining a quantitative sensor implementation alongside qualitative research. We show findings from two months of data collection on seven playgrounds and discuss next steps in the Data-Enabled Design framework.


The Office Jungle: A Vision for Wildness to Turn Offices into Jungles

The Office Jungle: A Vision for Wildness to Turn Offices into Jungles

Nieuweboer, I., Damen, I., Brombacher, H., Lévy, P., Vos, S., & Lallemand, C. (2020). The Office Jungle: A Vision for Wildness to Turn Offices into Jungles. Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference, 341–344. https://doi.org/10.1145/3393914.3395818

paperacm library

The Office Jungle is an experimental office environment designed to make offices more “wild”. Through this demonstration and associated design vision, we make a first attempt to reflect on and to define what characterizes wildness and how it could empower people in more playful and active lifestyles, particularly in the workplace. In our understanding, wildness is not an exclusive property of nature, but rather a condition that can be designed for. How wildness can be designed is described here in a set of design principles called “Design for Wildness”, inspired by the work of Gibson. The Office Jungle, a large geodesic sphere of 2 meters in diameter, is part and parcel of these design principles and can be used as a tool to design other wild environments. Such environments could benefit people working in the office, many of whom have been suffering the consequences of a sedentary lifestyle.


Designing for the everyday through thusness and irregularity

Designing for the everyday through thusness and irregularity

Lévy, P. (2019). Designing for the everyday through thusness and irregularity. In Proceedings of 8th International Congress of International Association of Societies of Design Research, IASDR 2019. Manchester, UK: Manchester Metropolitan University.

paper

The concept of ‘everyday’ is a central topic in design, and this paper argues for more attention and discussion on the everyday than what is currently done in design research. By elaborating what the everyday is, designers can better formulate a perspective on people’s lives and experiences, and therefore can better contribute to the enchantment of the everyday through designing. To contribute to this effort of clarification and enchantment, we first attempt to clarify the concept of everyday and thereafter suggest notions originating from Japanese philosophy to address the everyday in design. The everyday is described mostly through the process of quotidianisation of the unfamiliar towards the familiar. To support designing for the everyday, we propose to focus on Japanese notions: thusness and irregularity. Thusness invites to consider the experience of the here-and-now as being the active relation with the entirety of the world through interaction. Irregularity invites to keep something unexplained in the design, eliciting possibilities of exploration, openness, change, and the shift of perspective. Finally, three relatively practical design concepts, namely micro-considerations, micro-frictions, and (es)sential details, are proposed to support application of thusness and irregularity through design.


A Design Approach towards Affording the Trend of Privacy

A Design Approach towards Affording the Trend of Privacy

Muller, D.A., & Lévy, P. (2019). A Design Approach towards Affording the Trend of Privacy. In Design Interactive Systems Conference, DIS19. New York, NY, USA: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/3322276.3322324

paperacm library

Society is affected by the consequences of data collection, and there are trends visible in law, the public debate and technology that could make a privacy-conscious future possible. We study how to avoid data collection from the perspective and the role of design, to provide a starting point for new developments in this context. We do so by presenting a portfolio that exemplifies a range of possible design contributions. We show how to design smart products for retail and smart home while avoiding data collection, how to convince clients through design, and how to use design to spread awareness. We present design notions and reflections that stem from this portfolio for the synthesis of new designs, that further explore the potential of design in practice that affords the trend of privacy.


The beauty of making hot chocolate, an inquiry on designing for everyday rituals

The beauty of making hot chocolate, an inquiry on designing for everyday rituals

Lévy, P. (2018). The beauty of making hot chocolate – an inquiry on designing for everyday rituals. In Design Research Society 2018, DRS2018. Limerick, Ireland: Design Research Society. https://doi.org/10.21606/dma.2017.514

paper

The everyday is often mentioned in design, yet hardly inquired. The everyday is about what is banal, infraordinary, not memorable, as well as about the force that makes things habitual, endotic. In the research encompassing this paper, we question the everyday and explore opportunities to enchant it by design. This paper focuses more specifically on the design of everyday rituals, and aims to propose a descriptive framework to ‘read’ and compose such rituals. The elaboration of the framework is done based on a case study: the making of a hot chocolate in the morning. Through an autoethnographical approach, the main dimensions of the framework are determined (place and time, essentiality, and strength) and discussed. Throughout this inquiry, the value of a first-person perspective while designing for the everyday is discussed, as well as its relationship with the third-person perspective. This framework proposed points out the importance of quick iterations and of the consideration of consequences of design decision at all levels of the everyday ritual (structural, temporal, aesthetical, ethical…).


Analysis of the Design and Engineering-process towards a First Prototype in the Field of Sports and Vitality

Analysis of the Design and Engineering-process towards a First Prototype in the Field of Sports and Vitality

Janssen, M. A., Heuvel, R. van den, Megens, C. J. P. G., Levy, P. D. & Vos, S. B. (2018). Analysis of the design and engineering-process towards a first prototype in the field of sports and vitality. In Proceedings of 12th Conference of the International Sports Engineering Association, 2(6), 297. Brisbane, Queensland, Australia: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI). https://doi.org/10.3390/proceedings2060297

paper

The scope of technology has expanded towards areas such as sports and vitality, offering significant challenges for engineering designers. However, only little is known about the underlying design and engineering processes used within these fields. Therefore, this paper aims to get an in- depth understanding of these type of processes. During a three-day design competition (Hackathon), three groups of engineers were challenged to develop experience-able prototypes in the field of sports and vitality. Their process was monitored based on the Reflective Transformative Design process (RTD-process) framework, describing the various activities part of the design process. Groups had to keep track of their activities, and six group reflection-sessions were held. Results show that all groups used an open and explorative approach, they frequently swapped between activities, making them able to reflect on their actions. While spending more time on envisioning and creating a clear vision seem to relate to the quality of the design concept.


Light behavior design: violation of unification principles and the effect on the user experience

Light behavior design: violation of unification principles and the effect on the user experience

Dassen, W., Wensveen, S., & Lévy, P. (2017). Light Behavior Design: Violation of Unification Principles and the Effect on the User Experience. In Design Interactive Systems Conference, DIS17 (pp. 259–263). New York, NY, USA: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/3064857.3079157

paperacm library

Technological advances increase the possibilities for the aesthetics of interaction and the user experience. This is a growing field in the Human-Computer Interaction community (HCI). However, Lenz et al. [3] show that little is known about the relation between experiences and interaction. The current study explores this relation through the design of an interactive lamp. We compare a direct and a delayed coupling between the user’s action and the reaction of the light. The results provide empirical evidence that deliberately violating one of the unification principles (i.e., delayed response) triggers a more positively engaged experience. We discuss the result and further implications for design research.


3D-modeling and 3D-printing explorations on Japanese tea ceremony utensils

3D-modeling and 3D-printing explorations on Japanese tea ceremony utensils

Lévy, P., & Yamada, S. (2017). 3D-modeling and 3D-printing explorations on Japanese tea ceremony utensils. In Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interactions, TEI17 ([on CD]). Yokohama, Japan: ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/3024969.3024990

paperacm library

Technological advances increase the possibilities for the aesthetics of interaction and the user experience. This is a growing field in the Human-Computer Interaction community (HCI). However, Lenz et al. [3] show that little is known about the relation between experiences and interaction. The current study explores this relation through the design of an interactive lamp. We compare a direct and a delayed coupling between the user’s action and the reaction of the light. The results provide empirical evidence that deliberately violating one of the unification principles (i.e., delayed response) triggers a more positively engaged experience. We discuss the result and further implications for design research.


What matters for ritual visualization, towards a design tool for the description and the composition of rituals

What matters for ritual visualization, towards a design tool for the description and the composition of rituals

Lévy, P., & Hengeveld B.J. (2016). What matters for ritual visualization – Towards a design tool for the description and the composition of rituals. Proceedings of Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research International Conference 2016, KEER2016 ([on CD]). Leeds, UK: Japan Society of Kansei Engineering.

paper

Our lives are highly shaped by rituals. The way we wake up, the way we prepare tea or coffee are two of the many rituals many of us have constructed. As they structure our everyday lives, it is crucial to understand how to design them from a kansei design perspective. This Research-through-Design inquiry contributes to a larger research of addressing the way to design rituals. An annotated showcase of three ritual design projects is proposed. From the analysis of these three projects, we suggest 11 points of attention for the construction of a ritual visualization tool. This tool is expected to be used not only to support the analysis and the assessment of rituals, but also to contribute to the composition of rituals, towards the design of experientially rich rituals from an interaction perspective.


Reinventing the (steering) wheel, A kansei design approach for novel driving experience

Reinventing the (steering) wheel, A kansei design approach for novel driving experience

Kennedy, R., & Lévy, P. (2016). Reinventing the (steering) wheel – A kansei design approach for novel driving experience. Proceedings of Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research International Conference 2016, KEER2016 ([on CD]). Leeds, UK: Japan Society of Kansei Engineering.

paper

Over the last decades, the integration of digital technology in the automotive industry has caused important transformations for interaction design in regards with secondary controls, but much less in regards with primary controls. However, not only primary controls remain the dominant artefact to interact with in the driving experience, but also distracted drivers (i.e., interacting with secondary controls or other artefacts while driving) are a major reason of accidents. In this paper, we introduce a design project on the steering wheel, taken from a kansei design perspective. Based on a kansei design framework, structured by three stages (Expression, Gesture, Affect), we observed the way drivers interact with various forms of steering wheel in order to create design propositions for greater and safer driving experiences in the context of novel driving conditions, i.e., with novel technologies and recent driving techniques. This overall project aims at revisiting fully the driving experience, while inquiring further the framing of a direct kansei design approach.


Exploring the challenge of designing rituals

Exploring the challenge of designing rituals

Lévy, P. (2015). Exploring the challenge of designing rituals. In V., Popovic, A., Blackler, & B., Kraal (Eds.), the Proceedings of 6th International Congress of International Association of Societies of Design Research, IASDR 2015 ([on CD]). Brisbane, Australia: Queensland University of Technology.

paper

Our lives are a collection of rituals. The way we wake up, the way we leave or enter our home are two of the many rituals each of us have constructed, and they structure our everyday lives. However, designing rituals remains challenging because of the nested structures of events within a ritual (temporal complexity) and the required consistency between the ritual and the involved artifacts. In this first Research-through-Design iteration, we introduce a workshop done to explore the way to design rituals from an interaction design perspective. Our inquiry addresses such approach and aims at proposing tools to support the design or the evaluation of daily rituals. The workshop was structured by a introduction session (a Japanese tea ceremony) and two iterations leading towards the design of a high-resolution ritual and required artifacts for welcoming people home for Dutch students. Findings mainly pointed out different starting points for designing rituals, suggested the pervasive effect of engagement in rituals, and proposed a descriptive tool to provide the designer with participants’ perspectives in and affect by the ritual.


The Chatter Door, designing for in-between spaces

The Chatter Door, designing for in-between spaces

Duel, T., & Lévy, P. (2015). The Chatter Door, designing for in-between spaces. In V., Popovic, A., Blackler, & B., Kraal (Eds.), the Proceedings of 6th International Congress of International Association of Societies of Design Research, IASDR 2015 ([on CD]). Brisbane, Australia: Queensland University of Technology.

paper

The project presented in this paper is part of a broader research addressing in-between spaces and the designing of experiences taking place there. The project focuses on door frames, and inquires the way to improve social interactions taking place ‘at the door’. To do so, the approach is structured on an Experiential Design Landscape in order to create an in- between space with audio traces and to evaluate these traces impact on people’s behavior change. Our hypothesis is that sound traces triggers behavior changes. Evaluation is done quantitatively through the measurement of the door movements, and qualitatively based on laddering techniques mapped out in a mean-end chain. The results show no significant impact of the audio traces on people’s behavior change. However, emotional reactions could be observed. Although this first step revokes our hypothesis, it also has provided insight for further inquiry on in-between spaces.


Perception Theories and Kansei Design

Perception Theories and Kansei Design

Lévy, P. (2014). Perception Theories and Kansei Design. In P., Lévy, S., Schütte, & T., Yamanaka (Eds.), the Proceedings of Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research International Conference 2014, KEER2014 (pp 287–297). Linköping, Sweden: Japan Society of Kansei Engineering.

paper

Approaches to create artifacts taking kansei into consideration are multiple and are shared among various disciplines, such as kansei engineering, kansei science, and kansei design. In this paper, I focus on the discipline of kansei design and show that various approaches exist within this discipline. These can be characterized based on their focus: either the physical or the interactive materiality of the artifact. Indirect kansei design, mostly focusing on the physical materiality, is based on indirect (or mediated) perception theories. It often relies on representations, models, and metaphors to provide meaningful input to the design. Direct kansei design, mostly focusing on the interactive materiality, is based on direct (or ecological) perception theories. It mainly relies on the designerly attitude of the designer in the process, and apprehend design meaning to emerge from the reflection upon design exploration within the process. Describing and differentiating these two approaches show how kansei is considered differently by different approaches of kansei deign, looking forward a dialogue between these approaches in order to obtain a greater insight on kansei and on its consideration for designing.


Rite de transition, a design choreographic exploration of cultural value exchange, through development of intercultural ritual artefacts

Rite de transition, a design choreographic exploration of cultural value exchange, through development of intercultural ritual artefacts

Kint, J., Klooster, S., & Lévy, P. (2014). Rite de transition – a design choreographic exploration of cultural value exchange, through development of intercultural ritual artefacts. In P., Lévy, S., Schütte, & T., Yamanaka (Eds.), the Proceedings of Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research International Conference 2014, KEER2014 (pp 1115–1125). Linköping, Sweden: Japan Society of Kansei Engineering.

paper

This research project is called Rite de transition. By means of DesignChoreography, an approach developed by Sietske Klooster, we explore the rituals revolving around traditional Turkish marriage. In due course, inspired by an emotional and auto-ethnographic interpretation of the explored rituals, Klooster designs a novel ritual and artefact that intend to embody shared values, hence intercultural exchange. We choose for a bodily first person approach as we estimate that the complexities of the modern world – i.e. cultural clashes and the breakdown of cultures – require a radical change in tackling these issues. We suggest to move away from pure rational analytic approach our society adhered to. We are on the verge of a new era that embraces diversity and organic interaction that cannot and does not have to be standardized, fixed or rigidly defined anymore. Our approach is based on embodiment and phenomenology, allowing us to diverge from narrowing down broad societal and cultural issues to mere rational thinking and judging. We use DesignChoreography as a vehicle, since the knowing and making body can experience meanings and values that lie underneath visual appearance. By doing so we bring about our bodily understanding for intercultural interaction and exchange.


Exploring constituents for kansei design, towards a framework

Exploring constituents for kansei design, towards a framework

Lévy, P. (2013). Exploring constituents for kansei design, towards a framework. the Proceedings of 5th International Congress of International Association of Societies of Design Research, IASDR 2013 (pp 148–159). Tokyo, Japan: Shibaura University of Technology.

paper

Next to the well-developed and recognized kansei engineering and kansei science, the discipline of kansei design still appears as emerging and explorative. In this paper, after presenting succinctly the theoretical basis of the first two disciplines, I compare them with and focus more in detail on the bases of kansei design, along with an inspiration in Japanese philosophy and culture. In order to structure further the discipline, necessary for the creation of a robust and specific design framework, I describe the constituents of the discipline, i.e., the notions the designers should take into consideration to either describe and explore kansei through designing, or to reflect upon and validate kansei designs (especially interactivity aspects). Finally, these constituents are illustrated by two kansei design projects showing their value and the current explorations done on the topic of interactive materiality in kansei design.


People, Place, Process: Lessons Learnt on the Path to a d.school

People, Place, Process: Lessons Learnt on the Path to a d.school

Hillen, V., & Lévy, P. (2013). People, Place, Process: Lessons Learnt on the Path to a d.school. the Proceedings of International Conference on Engineering Design 2013, ICED13 ([on CD]). Seoul, Korea: The Design Society.

paper

Since 2006, Design Thinking education programs for master-level students have been developed at Ponts ParisTech, a leading French engineering school. This paper presents a longitudinal study of the creation and dissemination of Design Thinking (DT) as a discipline to educate top-level French students for innovation. From 2006 to 2012, 53 projects were carried out by a total of 224 students. A review is made of the instructional design of those DT projects, from local experiments through the creation of a d.school supported by the French Ministry of Education and Research to the dissemination of DT nationally. From this, key lessons are drawn for faculty members wanting to set up and disseminate DT in their own university. The paper advocates that a DT professor becomes a staging director who should consider three elements – people, place, and process – in order to create “the right conditions for students to innovate” (Leifer, Stanford). A faculty member’s task thus defines itself as the art of creating the best conditions for driving students’ journeys of exploration within a specific context, and represents a transformative and learning adventure.


Designing for Perceptual Crossing: designing and comparing three behaviors

Designing for Perceptual Crossing: designing and comparing three behaviors

Deckers, E.J.L., Wensveen, S., Lévy, P., & Ahn, R. (2013). Designing for Perceptual Crossing: designing and comparing three behaviors. the Proceedings of SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI'13 (pp 1901–1910). Paris, France: ACM. http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2470654.2466251

paperacm library

Perceptual crossing is the reciprocal interplay of perceiving while being perceived. In this paper we discuss the last iteration of our ongoing research project on designing for perceptive qualities in systems of interactive products. We describe the design of explorative behavior in an artifact to enable the artifact and a person to engage in perceptual crossing. The explorative behavior is compared to the following and active behavior, the results of two earlier iterations. Through the iterations we formulated, applied and evaluated design relevant knowledge in the form of seven design notions. These notions inform design-researchers and design-practitioners on how to design for perceptive qualities in systems of interactive products. Here we specifically focus on how the artifact detects active perceptive behavior of a person, and how the artifact becomes aware of bygone perception and anticipates on future perception. An experiment shows how participants preferred the resulting explorative behavior that is closest to our theoretical framework based on phenomenology.


Designing for perceptive qualities: 7 showcases

Designing for perceptive qualities: 7 showcases

Deckers, E.J.L., & Lévy, P. (2012). Designing for perceptive qualities: 7 showcases. the Proceedings of Design Interactive Systems Conference, DIS12 (pp 496–505). Newcastle, UK: ACM. http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2317956.2318030

paperacm library

In this paper we describe seven showcases, namely ‘BeTouched’, ‘Dawe & Valle’, ‘Wonderturf’, ‘IN2WACO’, ‘Blow!’, ‘ShyLight’ and ‘PeR’, that give relevant insights on how to design for perceptive qualities in artifacts. Designing these perceptive qualities hypothetically enables a person to engage in a reciprocal perceptive interplay with the artifact: perceptual crossing between person and artifact can happen. This paper is part of an ongoing research in which we designed, built and evaluated several artifacts with perceptive qualities and in which we discovered a set of design notions. The theoretical model and the design notions involved in this research-project are introduced. The showcases illustrate and give value insights on the application of the theoretical model and the design notions.


When Movement Invites to Experience: a Kansei Design Exploration on Senses' Qualities

When Movement Invites to Experience: a Kansei Design Exploration on Senses’ Qualities

Lévy, P., Deckers, E.J.L., & Restrepo Cruz, M. (2012). When Movement Invites to Experience: a Kansei Design Exploration on Senses' Qualities. In the Proceedings of Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research International Conference 2012, KEER12 ([on CD]). Penghu, Taiwan: Japan Society of Kansei Engineering.

paper

In this paper, we introduce a Research through Design on Sensual Dynamics, and explore four design projects (namely Be Touched!, Sound Flowers, Shylight, and Blow!) from which we extract design notions providing valuable insights on how to design with and for the senses’ quality ‘reciprocity’. ‘Sensual Dynamics’ designs are artifacts that are able to sense one person and to behave upon her presnece to invite for movements enhancing the perceptive experience. Such an artifact is therefore at the same time the object of the experience as well as the trigger for a greater perceptive experience.


Developing a design approach, exploring resistance and ambiguity

Developing a design approach, exploring resistance and ambiguity

Trotto, A., Hummels, C.C.M., & Lévy, P. (2012). Developing a design approach, exploring resistance and ambiguity. In the Proceedings of Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research International Conference 2012, KEER12 ([on CD]). Penghu, Taiwan: Japan Society of Kansei Engineering.

paper

Designers face the world’s complexity at an experiential level. We consider Making (synthesising and concretising) an essential activity of designers, prior to Thinking (analysing and abstracting), because only through experience – a result of acting in the world – we achieve meaning, funnelling human intentionality. Making enables designers to explore the unknown by trusting their senses and their kansei, exploring resistance and ambiguity and by tapping into their intuition. Because ‘intuition begins with the sense that what is not yet could be’, it involves skills, as skills are our way to make sense of the world, transform it and to cater for ethics.
In this paper we describe a one-day workshop that has been held during the CHItaly conference 2011 in Alghero, Italy. During that day, we explored how the integration of points of view, using intuition through skills can communicate and create a richer meaning. The assignment was to design an empowering and enabling tool that allows a person to begin to experience another person’s skill. To be able to design such a tool, designers had to go through several steps of documenting and reflecting upon their own and each other’s skills.
We reflect on the experience and explain how this approach can support the integration of points of view, which is considered to be formed by personal experience, by skills, and by kansei.


Ohlala: Exploring the Relation between Content Completeness and Emotional Experience

Ohlala: Exploring the Relation between Content Completeness and Emotional Experience

Lévy, P., Kuenen, S., Overbeeke, K., Uchiyama, T., & Yamanaka, T. (2011). Ohlala: Exploring the Relation between Content Completeness and Emotional Experience. In N., Roozenburg, L.L., Chen, & P.J., Stappers (Eds.), the Proceedings of International Association of Societies of Design Research 2011, IASDR11 ([on CD]). Delft, The Netherlands: Delft University of Technology.

paper

Among other explorations, the field of telepresence technology has looked at ways to create a feeling of telepresence based on the transfer of minimal information. On this topic, the Cololo project has taken an extreme position by proposing the experience of 1-bit communication.
Based on the observation of Cololo in use, it is shown that content is not necessary to trigger an emotional experience. This paper introduces a novel dimension to be taken into consideration in communication technology: the content-completeness dimension, ranging from non-content to hyper-content. Furthermore, we built the Ohlala framework, aiming to explore the content-completeness dimension. Based on Ohlala, by way of a research through design, we intend to explore further the relations between this dimension on communication and emotional experience.


Luciole, lighting up the design process

Luciole, lighting up the design process

Lévy, P., Wijnen, J., Hummels, C.C.M., & Vinke, A.A. (2011). Luciole, lighting up the design process. In P., Marti, A., Soro, L., Gamberini, & S., Bagnara (Eds.), the Proceedings of 9th ACM SIGCHI Italian Chapter International Conference on Computer-Human Interaction Facing Complexity - CHItaly (pp 103). Alghero, Italy: ACM. http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2037296.2037323

paperacm library

The Industrial Design Department of Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) is continuously developing and putting in practice a holistic and integrative educational approach, focusing on designing intelligent systems, products, and related services for societal transformation. This approach requires students to continuously reflect upon their design process and their results. Therefore, we are exploring how to support them in documenting and reflecting on their design projects.
This paper introduces the first design iterations of Luciole, a design process visualisation tool based on and integrated in the educational model of TU/e.ID. These first iterations show clearly the students? benefit of using Luciole. This tool supports students in their design processes and in their reflection upon them. It is viewed as a tool to assist reflection upon designing, communication with coaches, and assessment.
Finally, a first functional prototype of Luciole is introduced, as a means for further research. A long term user-test is currently conducted in order to validate the actual relevancy of Luciole as a tool to support education at TU/e.ID, and to evaluate the students? appreciation and use of the tool.


Bringing Forth Constructivist Education Assessment: A Frame of Reference to Inspire and to Support Design Education

Bringing Forth Constructivist Education Assessment: A Frame of Reference to Inspire and to Support Design Education

Lévy, P., Hummels, C.C.M., & Vinke, A.A. (2011). Bringing Forth Constructivist Education Assessment: A Frame of Reference to Inspire and to Support Design Education. the Proceedings of Fifth International Conference on Design Principles and Practices ([on CD]). Rome, Italy: CGPublisher.

paper

The Industrial Design Department of Eindhoven University of Technology is continuously developing and putting in practice a holistic and integrative educational approach, focusing on designing intelligent systems, products and related services for societal transformation.
During the semester, each student is supported by a personal coach, by assignors and experts, who eventually provide feedbacks on the student’s learning, achievement, and reflection upon learning. During the end-of-term assessment, students are evaluated on their overall development (taking skills, knowledge, reflection, attitude and identity into account). After describing the rational of the educational system of TU/e and its process in practice, this paper focuses on the introduction of a new educational tool aiming at supporting education, assessment included: the Frame of Reference.
The holistic quality of the educational system allows the personalisation of the entire student career. Therefore, there are as many visions and student paths as the number of students. Each student is different from others in terms of their knowledge, skills and experience. Consequently, no standardized criteria can be properly applied to the evaluation procedure.
The Frame of Reference is structured as an intelligent space, both physical and virtual, and adaptive to the visitors’ expectations and experience. It offers referential works and development of design students (prototypes, reports, showcases…), illustrating stages of and processes for competency development and over-all development as a designer. The Frame of Reference is introduced and described as a place for sharing points of views and experiences, between students, coaches, experts, assessors, and external visitors. It is designed to inspire and to support students as well as staff, by creating a comprehensive and clearer, yet non-homogenous vision of what students throughout the department achieve, of how this is evaluated and how this contributes to students’ overall competence of designing.


Developing sensory functions: transfer human senses from contextual perception

Developing sensory functions: transfer human senses from contextual perception

Tsai, T.J., Lévy, P., Ono, K., & Watanabe, M. (2010). Developing sensory functions: transfer human senses from contextual perception. In P., Lévy, C., Bouchard, T., Yamanaka, & A., Aoussat (Eds.), the Proceedings of Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research International Conference 2010 - KEER2010 (pp 304–313). Paris, France: Japan Society of Kansei Engineering.

paper

Approaches in interaction design were explored a hyperspace that human cognitive actions and interactive system in both two end. Recently, this dualism in diverse direction is integrated in a notion of context, which had brought from social science as the manifest of implicit interactions that makes ‘sense’ from human actions or activities. In this research, we applied perception in ecological view to capture the stimuli of context in its dynamic nature, and proposed a notion of sensory function in extracting the transfer character of sensorimotor as transmitting signals to perception. Firstly, a theoretical approach in integrated context and perception was reviewed as the nature of stimuli and sensorimotor that can offer a grounded knowledge to carry images of context to perceptual actions. Secondly, we practiced a process in conductive way to analysis and synthesis the transfer function as a notion of sensory function. Thirdly, an application of prototype was built for order action that situated in a coffee shop, and implemented with a concept of ‘waiter cup’. To conclude, this study may be important to support incentive observation at the early design stage, and provides a tool to exploring contextual perception in designing interaction.


Prospective psychophysiological approach for Kansei design: knowledge sharing between psychophysiology and design

Prospective psychophysiological approach for Kansei design: knowledge sharing between psychophysiology and design

Lévy, P., Yamanaka, T., Ono, K., & Watanabe, M. (2009). Prospective psychophysiological approach for Kansei design: knowledge sharing between psychophysiology and design. the Proceedings of International Association of Societies of Design Research Conference 2009 - IASDR09 ([on CD]). Seoul, Korea: Korean Society of Design Science.

paper

This paper introduces an interdisciplinary design method, based on psychophysiological knowledge used as inspirational means for Kansei design. After describing the interest for such method, this paper describes each step of the method, from pre-ideation steps to actual design process based on the knowledge of human behavior phenomena and of their mechanisms. This description is supported by two examples. The teaching of this method to design master students pointed out not only the great possibilities of this method as an interdisciplinary approach in Kansei design, but also the difficulties of using scientific literature and knowledge in design.


Colourful Rain, Experiencing Synaesthesia

Colourful Rain, Experiencing Synaesthesia

Lévy, P., Kim, D., Tsai, T.J., Lee, S.H., & Yamanaka, T. (2009). Colourful Rain – Experiencing Synaesthesia. the Proceedings of International Conference on Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces - DPPI09 ([on CD]). Compiègne, France.

paper

This paper introduces a Kansei design method using psychophysiological research output as an inspiration means for the design of products taking highly into consideration user’s Kansei. The development of this method is itself a part of a series of design method creation based on the collaboration of the research fields of psychophysiology and design. The Kansei design method is based on four major steps involving both a classic design process and a literature investigation in psychophysiology. The main difficulty for the Kansei designer is to take into consideration the scientific rigor of the literature and to succeed to describe properly the behavioural phenomenon(a) she/he wishes to involve in the design process. As an example of design output, the colourful-rain umbrella is introduced. This umbrella lets its user to experience a rare synaesthetic perceptive phenomenon: all sounds in the rainy street are also perceived as colours (visually). To do so, the synaesthetic phenomenon is detailed from a psychophysiological point of view.


Methods and Means for Kansei Design

Methods and Means for Kansei Design

Lévy, P., Yamanaka, T., & Tomico, O. (2009). Methods and Means for Kansei Design. the Proceedings of ErgoDesign Forum 2009 ([on CD]). Lyon, France.

paper

Through the example of three projects, this paper describes emerging methods and means used in the field of Kansei design studies:

  • The use of tools built for psychophysiology and for constructive psychology in order to support designers’ work focusing on human beings’ behaviours and mental schemes;
  • The use of knowledge created by psychophysiological research as an inspirational source for industrial design, taking into consideration the latest scientific progress in psychophysiology;
  • The use of psychophysiology tools to complete design requirements. Each point presented here is supported by an applicative example.


User's appreciation of engagement in service design: The case of food service design

User’s appreciation of engagement in service design: The case of food service design

Lévy, P., & Wakabayashi, N. (2008). User's appreciation of engagement in service design: The case of food service design. the Proceedings of International Service Innovation Design Conference 2008 - ISIDC08 ([on CD]). Busan, Korea.

paper

This research focuses on the engagement in service design. It aims at understanding how users appreciate or not their own engagement in the service process. As a case study for the experiment, various ways of ‘making tea’ were used, and were presented to the subject. Based on the repertory grid method and the means-end chain technique, subjects’ preferences and mental model evaluation structure were captured and analyzed. As a result, two major aspects were extracted: the preference for easiness of preparation, and preference for control over the preparation process. Finally, it was noticed and discussed that engagement in service design was perceived as positive for social services, but bothering for personal one. Also, user’s control and service feedback to the users’ senses were discussed and proposed as service design recommendations.


An Approach on Functional Analysis in Developing Guideline for Designing Service-embedded Product

An Approach on Functional Analysis in Developing Guideline for Designing Service-embedded Product

Tsai, T.J., Lévy, P., Ono, K., & Watanabe, M. (2008). An Approach on Functional Analysis in Developing Guideline for Designing Service-embedded Product. the Proceedings of International Service Innovation Design Conference 2008 - ISIDC08 ([on CD]). Busan, Korea.

paper

In recently, we designers aimed at discovering new domain of service and product to find the opportunities in order to create users need or demands in their daily life. However, the guidelines are still neglect for us to process design thinking for solution output. In the first part of this paper, the notion of service-embedded product (SeP) will be defined in environment of service-product-integration. And we described approaches for designing interaction of SeP for improving qualities as the background. For this matter, we found the function in designing is not only inferred to the product itself and more in service and needed systematic approach. Thereafter, we proposed a Functional Analysis tool, which adapted from the APTE® in solve complex problems by analyzing values through the functions. For this purpose, a list of keywords related to service-product-integration and designing interaction, was extracted from 432 articles from CiNii during the period between January and May 2008. The result presents and constructs several terms for guideline in describing designing interaction functions, such as Information Tangibility, Gateway Accessibility Network Protocol and Product Affordability, to be used as core concepts to design interactions for SeP. By these results, we intend to develop a design tool for SeP in Service and Product Design (SPD) filed in the future.


Development of Competences for Service Design

Development of Competences for Service Design

Ono, K., Lévy, P., Ishizuka, A., Hachima, S., & Waatanabe, M. (2008). Development of Competences for Service Design. the Proceedings of International Service Innovation Design Conference 2008 - ISIDC08 ([on CD]). Busan, Korea.

paper

Objective of this research is to clarify crucial competences for designers who design service and competences that education institutes should develop for future service designers.
To refer about Service Design, firstly, it is necessary to clarify each of two concepts, design and service, that both are elusive.
In this research, design is treated as a process to create a meaningful new option through doing simulation of creation, imagination (of people who will enjoy the benefit) and evaluation.
Regarding service, this research shows that a concept of service includes several different concepts and those are able to be categorized into two major concepts.
One is the concept of service in a narrow sense, which there are nothing left after goods are bought and sold and nonphysical economic goods to provide satisfaction and utility (e.g. cleaning shop, hair salon, etc). Another is the concept of service in a broad sense which is economic nonphysical combination of goods of products, information and narrow services for getting satisfaction and utility (e.g. restaurant, car dealer, hotel, etc). Consequently this research proposes that broad service is that we should cover and the competence we should develop is to do cycle in a level of combination of products, information and narrow services.
However about the way to develop the competence, if the simulation of creation, imagination and evaluation is the exclusive means in order to create a meaningful new option, it might be impossible to start to do the simulation in a level of narrow services without any knowledge and experience and also difficult to find the excuse that designer should be competent for the simulation in a level of narrow services.
Therefore, by expanding the ability of imagination which enhanced by repeating the simulation in a level of products and information as conventional design process to the level of service, the competence for creating meaningful new services in a narrow, also broad service should be developed.


Designing based on the evoked metaphor, Case study

Designing based on the evoked metaphor, Case study

Lévy, P., & Yamanaka, T. (2008). Designing based on the evoked metaphor - Case study. In D., Marjanovic, M., Storga, N., Pavkovic, & N., Bojcetic (Eds.), the Proceedings of 10th International Design Conference 2008 (pp 1095 – 1104). Dubrovnik, Croatia.

paper

Kansei physiological measurements and contructivist psychological explorations for approaching user subjective experience during and after product usage

Kansei physiological measurements and contructivist psychological explorations for approaching user subjective experience during and after product usage

Tomico, O., Mizutani, N., Lévy, P., Takahiro, Y., & Yamanaka, T. (2008). Kansei physiological measurements and contructivist psychological explorations for approaching user subjective experience during and after product usage. In D., Marjanovic, M., Storga, N., Pavkovic, & N., Bojcetic (Eds.), the Proceedings of 10th International Design Conference 2008 (pp 529 – 536). Dubrovnik, Croatia.

paper

The aim of this article is to explore the suitability of psycho-physiological measures (e.g. levels of pleasure, excitement and comfortableness during the usage obtained from physiological measures) and psychological explorations (e.g. users’ reflections about their needs for interaction obtained from an interview) for approaching user subjective experience during and after the interaction with a product takes place (explorative usage and reflection processes).

For this purpose the 2-point Electroencephalogram (EEG) comfort measurement is used to gather realtime information about how a person feels during the interaction with a product and the Repertory Grid Technique (RGT) interview is used to gather information about what people’s primary goals and concerns are and about the meaning placed on the purpose outside the immediate experience (after interacting with a product).


Explaining kansei design studies

Explaining kansei design studies

Lévy, P., Nakamori, S., & Yamanaka, T. (2008). Explaining kansei design studies. In P.M.A., Desmet, S., Tsvetanova, P., Hekkert, & L., Justice (Eds.), the Proceedings of Design and Emotion Conference 2008 - D&E08 ([on CD]). Hong-Kong: School of Design, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

paper

Within the last thirty years, Kansei studies have become an important field of research in Japan. More recently, foreign researchers have become more and more interested in understating the approach, despite the difficulties related to the cultural dimension of Kansei and Kansei studies. The aim of this research is to propose to westerners a clear description of what Kansei and Kansei studies are, and how it is different from classic western approaches on sensory or emotion design. Using this description of Kansei studies, a brainstorming has been organized to determine a list of keywords (KSK) used to structure and map comprehensively Kansei-related source of information. Moreover, a participative tool, called KanseiTako, is introduced. This tool aims at providing researchers, educators, and students, with an organized and useful set of knowledge sources to structure comprehensively the research field and the education in Kansei studies.


Kansei Studies Description and Mapping through Kansei Studies Keywords

Kansei Studies Description and Mapping through Kansei Studies Keywords

Lévy, P., & Yamanaka, T. (2008). Kansei Studies Description and Mapping through Kansei Studies Keywords. the Proceedings of International Symposium on Emotion and Sensitivity 2008 - ISES08 ([on CD]). Daejeon, Korea.

paper

The aim of this paper is to present the project undertaken by the authors to describe Kansei and to structure Kansei design studies. Indeed, the current fuzziness on Kansei research structure complicates the global comprehension of this field and seems to be a hindrance to Kansei design education and internationalization. To improve both of these aspects, this paper proposes a comprehensive description of Kansei and Kansei Studies, explains its specificity compared to ‘classic’ research fields, and introduces a list of 131 Kansei Studies Keywords which will be used in further projects to structure Kansei sources of knowledge and improve Kansei knowledge development, Kansei research, and Kansei education.


Kansei-Physiological Measurements and Constructivist, Psychological Explorations for Approaching User's Subjective Experience during and after the Product Use

Kansei-Physiological Measurements and Constructivist, Psychological Explorations for Approaching User’s Subjective Experience during and after the Product Use

Yamanaka, T., Tomico, O., Mizutani, N., Yokoi, T., Cho, Y., & Lévy, P. (2008). Kansei-Physiological Measurements and Constructivist – Psychological Explorations for Approaching User's Subjective Experience during and after the Product Use. the Proceedings of International Symposium on Emotion and Sensitivity 2008 - ISES08 ([on CD]). Daejeon, Korea.

paper

The aim of this paper is to present the project undertaken by the authors to describe Kansei and to structure Kansei design studies. Indeed, the current fuzziness on Kansei research structure complicates the global comprehension of this field and seems to be a hindrance to Kansei design education and internationalization. To improve both of these aspects, this paper proposes a comprehensive description of Kansei and Kansei Studies, explains its specificity compared to “classic” research fields, and introduces a list of 131 Kansei Studies Keywords which will be used in further projects to structure Kansei sources of knowledge and improve Kansei knowledge development, Kansei research, and Kansei education.


Interdisciplinary Design Method for EcoDesign, Introducing Kansei research for design to EcoDesign

Interdisciplinary Design Method for EcoDesign, Introducing Kansei research for design to EcoDesign

Lévy, P., & Yamanaka, T. (2007). Interdisciplinary Design Method for EcoDesign – Introducing Kansei research for design to EcoDesign. the Proceedings of 5th International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing - EcoDesign2007 ([on CD]). Tokyo, Japan.

paper

This paper presents an interdisciplinary design method and shows its relevance for EcoDesign. Interdisciplinary design intends to design a product considering its entire context, by the participation of various disciplines. A metaphorical level is required and built in the design process in order to involve properly all disciplines. This continuous participation of every involved discipline makes this design method fully interdisciplinary and relevant for EcoDesign. After introducing the objectives of EcoDesign and interdisciplinary design, the method of interdisciplinary design method will be detailed. This description will be useful to understand how interdisciplinary design works, and how it can be useful for EcoDesign. Finally, it will be suggested that Kansei research for design, which is at the origin of this research, can be a source of new development to improve the quality of human factors in EcoDesign.


On Kansei and Kansei Design: a Description of a Japanese Design Approach

On Kansei and Kansei Design: a Description of a Japanese Design Approach

Lévy, P., Lee, S.H., & Yamanaka, T. (2007). On Kansei and Kansei Design: a Description of a Japanese Design Approach. the Proceedings of International Association of Societies of Design Research Conference 2007 - IASDR07 ([on CD]). Hong-Kong: School of Design, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

paper

Kansei design methods are successful in the Japanese industry and academic worlds. Outside Japan, their level of development and recognition is nothing compared with the situation inside of Japan. One of the reasons is that there is currently no comprehensive description of Kansei and Kansei studies written for the international community. This paper intends to provide such description, to analyze involved cultural differences, and to describe how Kansei is involved in the Japanese design approaches. To do so, an overview of main descriptions of Kansei is realized and synthesized into a comprehensive and useful description. Thereafter, Kansei study objectives and methods are analyzed and their differences with that of western approach. Finally, the implication of Kansei in Japanese design is explained. This research intends to improve western understanding of Kansei, and to improve mutual understanding in both industrial and academic worlds between East and West.


Creating an Evoked Metaphor for Kansei Design

Creating an Evoked Metaphor for Kansei Design

Lévy, P., Yamanaka, T., Wang, L., & Igarashi, H. (2007). Creating an Evoked Metaphor for Kansei Design. the Proceedings of International Conference on Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research - KEER07 ([on CD]). Sapporo, Japan.

paper

The Kansei design method allows interdisciplinary workgroups to process design projects using an original knowledge sharing system. This system is based on the SECI Model, already recognized as one of the most efficient models for creative projects. To minimize knowledge distortions due to the interdisciplinary quality of the workgroup, a tool called Evoked Metaphor is inserted to the SECI process. Thanks to the Evoked Metaphor, all shared knowledge can be understood intuitively by any member of the design workgroup, and can be validated on disciplinary points of view. This allows any member of the workgroup, regardless her/his own specialty, to participate to any step of the design process and to communicate with other members. This paper recalls the way the Evoked Metaphor can be used in the Kansei design process, and focuses on its construction method. To illustrate the construction process, an example is proposed concerning a car navigation project.


Towards a definition of Kansei

Towards a definition of Kansei

Lévy, P., & Yamanaka, T. (2006). Towards a definition of Kansei. the Proceedings of 2006 Design Research Society International Conference, Wonderground 2006 ([on CD]). Lisbon, Portugal

paper

This paper introduces a new research aiming at defining the term Kansei using western philosophical concepts. In the literature, all definitions of the term Kansei are imprecise, even incorrect in most of the case. This is mainly due to the fact that Kansei is a Japanese term, which does not have direct translation in any western language. However, a deeper research has to be pursued to bring the research in Kansei, in Kansei Information, in Kansei Science, and so forth to an international level. This objective requires many research fields to meet in an interdisciplinary research environment following the example of previous works done in other fields, but also trying to link Japanese and Westerns concepts. This paper is an invitation for interested people to contact the research team.


MATiK, CMC design by Kansei Information approach

MATiK, CMC design by Kansei Information approach

Lévy, P., & Yamanaka, T. (2006). MATiK – CMC design by Kansei Information approach. the Proceedings of Kansei Engineering and Intelligent Systems - KEIS'06 ([on CD]). Aizu, Japan

paper

In this paper, we introduce the work-in-progress of the design a CMC (Computer-Mediated Communication) system called MATiK. The originality of this design is not only the result, i.e. MATiK, but also the Kansei Information based design methodology used to design it. The later uses intuition as a knowledge-sharing process among the design workgroup members. An original conceptualizing tool (the Evoked Metaphor) is introduced in the paradigm of the sharing knowledge process (the SECI Model) to allow members of the interdisciplinary design workgroup to work together upon individual and disciplinary differences. MATiK includes an original function simulating the “cocktail party phenomenon” in the information flow management system of the CMC. This new function improves drastically the quality of social aspects of communications over computers by taking into considerations subjective and social aspects of all the users. Therefore, this paper proposes to discuss the implications of Kansei on sharing knowledge to overpass the current limits of the information technologies, before introducing MATiK and its design process.


Kansei information approach for an interdisciplinary design method proposal based on intuition

Kansei information approach for an interdisciplinary design method proposal based on intuition

Lévy, P., & Yamanaka, T. (2006). Kansei information approach for an interdisciplinary design method proposal based on intuition. In D., Marjanovic (Eds.), the Proceedings of 9th International Design Conference 2006 (pp 1475 – 1482). Dubrovnik, Croatia.

paper

Considering the complexity of the artefact (artefact means here human construction, to be opposed with the Nature construction. It gathers objects, processes, services and their systems), great design improvements can succeed thanks to an interdisciplinary approach. However, interdisciplinary knowledge sharing encounters many issues, due to disciplinary ontology and human subjective understanding. For designers to adopt an interdisciplinary behaviour, a method is required. This paper introduces a methodological solution, based on intuition.


Introducing MATiK service, Proposition for a new IT communication system through an approach in Kansei

Introducing MATiK service, Proposition for a new IT communication system through an approach in Kansei

Lévy, P., & Yamanaka, T. (2004). Introducing MATiK service – Proposition for a new IT communication system through an approach in Kansei. the Proceedings of 2004 Design Research Society International Conference - Futureground 2004 ([on CD]). Melbourne, Australia: Monash University.

paper

Even though IT is a very convenient tool for virtual communities to correspond, limitations are many and, for most of them, already known. This paper focuses on the issues related with tacit knowledge and subjective communication. The aim is to introduce an original software taking user’s subjectivity into account to optimize information flow.
This research has been launch as a part of the 21st Century COE Program, sponsored by the MEXT, aiming at structuring Kansei as a science. Three laboratories with different specialties are working on this common program. As various knowledge is sharing between various people, a quick multiplication of mailing-lists occurred, creating a chaotic situation, preventing efficient communication. The wish to share knowledge (a fortiori tacit one) would fail if nothing was done.
MATiK is introduced as an original communication system satisfying determined requirements for optimized information sharing in an interdisciplinary workgroup. This introduction is done by pointing out the lack of currently existing systems: there is no consideration of the link between message content and user’s specificities. This link is shown as a solution for information flow optimization.
Then, a similarity concept, the loft, is introduced in order to explain the global operating procedure of MATiK, i.e. its information flow management. This ideation process, through highly subjective similarity concept, is favoring Kansei design approach. Next step of MATiK design will be presented in further publications.


Illustrative Industrial Interactions Through Kansei - Towards a dynamic reflection of Kansei in the Marketing/Design/Engineering relationship

Illustrative Industrial Interactions Through Kansei – Towards a dynamic reflection of Kansei in the Marketing/Design/Engineering relationship

Sanabria, J.C., Lévy, P., & Lee, S.H. (2003). Illustrative Industrial Interactions Through Kansei – Towards a dynamic reflection of Kansei in the Marketing/Design/Engineering relationship. In H., Aoki (Eds.), the Proceedings of 6th Asian Design International Conference - 6thADC ([on CD]). Tsukuba, Japan: University of Tsukuba.

paper

The industry of product conception mainly involves decision makers from the fields of marketing, design and engineering. In this study, the perception of the information through this process that influences the decision makers was analyzed through a survey riding on a Kansei approach. This approach emphasizes the influence of the professionals’ personality and characteristics. The subjects’ average perception of the concepts was retrieved through positioning them into a map without considering their individual influence. On a second phase, it was showed that the lack of issues, such as personality or individual characteristics, limited the possibilities of the map. The analysis began with the definition of the fields marketing, design, engineering, and Kansei, and a brain- storming for obtaining the keywords related to the three fields interaction. The resulting keywords were redefined and distributed on a pilot-map with an x-axis divided into user/product, and a y-axis divided into tangible/intangible. For validating the pilot-map the same survey was applied to professionals involved in marketing, design and engineering and the results were projected originally into an average map without considering personal data. On account of the limited information retrieved on this map, a group of wider maps was generated considering personality and characteristics.
Integrating the Kansei approach by considering personality of the subjects, improved the possibilities of the model and gave rise to a source of flexible patterns of information that improved the understanding of the industrial environment relationships. In the future, the final mapping system may be used as an observation tool for magnifying the different possible intersections and patterns between the professionals involved in the fields of marketing, design and engineering and as a platform for further analysis of industrial interaction.


Including Interdisciplinary to Industrial Design

Including Interdisciplinary to Industrial Design

Lévy, P., & Guénand, A. (2003). Including Interdisciplinary to Industrial Design. In A., Folkeson, K., Gralen, M., Norell, & U., Sellgren (Eds.), the Proceedings of 14th International Conference on Engineering Design - ICED 03 (pp 665-666 (exec.summ.)). Stockholm, Sweden http://dx.doi.org/DS31_1042FPD

paper

The product is a complex element. In addition to its material, formal and functional dimensions, products are based on many other dimensions, which are of a sensory, emotional, cultural, historic (and so on) nature. Product design unceasingly tries to design products by taking into account of their complexity and thus of a maximum of these dimensions. An enlargement designer’s work necessarily goes through interdisciplinary. That is all the more significant since interdisciplinary design leads the way for sustainable design, which will enable the design to progress again, and will also enable the designer to be finally able to respect its social responsibilities which he or she bears as a creator of industrial products. This paper intends to present how the education of designers can influence efficiently the profession to integrate interdisciplinary into the industrial design process. Lastly, we present the research in progress at the Department of Industrial Design of Compiègne University of Technology, developing an assistance tool for interdisciplinary pedagogy in the education of industrial design. This tool not only aims at accompanying the student in his or her interdisciplinary pedagogic projects, but also the teaching team to set up interdisciplinary pedagogic teams.