A Design Approach towards Affording the Trend of Privacy

A Design Approach towards Affording the Trend of Privacy

Muller, D.A., & Lévy, P. (2019). A Design Approach towards Affording the Trend of Privacy. In Design Interactive Systems Conference, DIS19. New York, NY, USA: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/3322276.3322324

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Society is affected by the consequences of data collection, and there are trends visible in law, the public debate and technology that could make a privacy-conscious future possible. We study how to avoid data collection from the perspective and the role of design, to provide a starting point for new developments in this context. We do so by presenting a portfolio that exemplifies a range of possible design contributions. We show how to design smart products for retail and smart home while avoiding data collection, how to convince clients through design, and how to use design to spread awareness. We present design notions and reflections that stem from this portfolio for the synthesis of new designs, that further explore the potential of design in practice that affords the trend of privacy.


Light behavior design: violation of unification principles and the effect on the user experience

Light behavior design: violation of unification principles and the effect on the user experience

Dassen, W., Wensveen, S., & Lévy, P. (2017). Light Behavior Design: Violation of Unification Principles and the Effect on the User Experience. In Design Interactive Systems Conference, DIS17 (pp. 259–263). New York, NY, USA: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/3064857.3079157

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Technological advances increase the possibilities for the aesthetics of interaction and the user experience. This is a growing field in the Human-Computer Interaction community (HCI). However, Lenz et al. [3] show that little is known about the relation between experiences and interaction. The current study explores this relation through the design of an interactive lamp. We compare a direct and a delayed coupling between the user’s action and the reaction of the light. The results provide empirical evidence that deliberately violating one of the unification principles (i.e., delayed response) triggers a more positively engaged experience. We discuss the result and further implications for design research.


The Chatter Door, designing for in-between spaces

The Chatter Door, designing for in-between spaces

Duel, T., & Lévy, P. (2015). The Chatter Door, designing for in-between spaces. In V., Popovic, A., Blackler, & B., Kraal (Eds.), the Proceedings of 6th International Congress of International Association of Societies of Design Research, IASDR 2015 ([on CD]). Brisbane, Australia: Queensland University of Technology.

paper

The project presented in this paper is part of a broader research addressing in-between spaces and the designing of experiences taking place there. The project focuses on door frames, and inquires the way to improve social interactions taking place ‘at the door’. To do so, the approach is structured on an Experiential Design Landscape in order to create an in- between space with audio traces and to evaluate these traces impact on people’s behavior change. Our hypothesis is that sound traces triggers behavior changes. Evaluation is done quantitatively through the measurement of the door movements, and qualitatively based on laddering techniques mapped out in a mean-end chain. The results show no significant impact of the audio traces on people’s behavior change. However, emotional reactions could be observed. Although this first step revokes our hypothesis, it also has provided insight for further inquiry on in-between spaces.